Green Truck Partnership

The Green Truck Partnership is an alliance between Roads and Maritime Services and the road transport industry. Its purpose is to commission agreed independent testing of products that claim to improve the environmental performance of heavy vehicles.

Search case studies and meta studies

The Green Truck Partnership publishes studies of specific techniques and equipment aimed at reducing emissions and increasing efficiency.
Search for a study by category, or alternatively view the full list of available case studies and meta studies.

Steering Group

A Steering Group to oversee the Green Truck Partnership has been established and consists of representatives from the road transport industry and government.

The Green Truck Partnership Steering Group is responsible for deciding which products are tested and the agreed protocols for testing.

The purpose of this testing is to assist road transport operators make an informed decision when purchasing products to improve the environmental performance of their heavy vehicle(s).

Steering Group members

  • Australia Post
  • BIS
  • Blacktown Council
  • Boral
  • Coles
  • EPA

  • LNG Refuellers
  • Roads and Maritime Services
  • Ron Finemore Transport
  • TIC
  • TOLL
  • Transport for NSW

Transport for NSW's Manager Freight Emissions, Infrastructure and Services Division and Roads and Maritime's Senior Project Engineer (Technical), Operational Support and Development, Safety and Compliance Division are advisors to the Green Truck Partnership Steering Group.

Case studies

Automated Manual Transmissions

The purpose of this trial was to assess the fuel efficiency benefits of Automated Manual Transmission (AMT) systems for heavy vehicle operation relative to conventional fully automatic transmission systems. the trial vehicles were urban tippers operating in the Greater Sydney region in NSW.

B20 biodiesel (tallow derived)

This trial sough to quantify the differences in fuel consumption associate with the use of B20 relative to the use of conventional diesel fuel for heavy vehicle operation. The trial involved the comparison of fuel consumption under diesel (before) and B20 (after) in eight linehaul vehicles operating in regional Victoria and NSW.

CNG (spark-ignition engines)

The purpose of this trial was to assess the economic and environmental performance of CNG spark-ignited engine technology relative to conventional compression-ignition diesel technology. The trial involved the comparison of the fuel consumption data derived from the in-field operation of three diesel trucks with two CNG trucks. All five vehicles were concrete agitators operating in the Greater Sydney region of NSW.

Lift trailer axles

This trial sought to quantify the fuel efficiency benefits of using lift axles on truck trailers (single). The trial was conducted for a mixed linehaul in the Greater Sydney metropolitan area of NSW.

Liquefied Natural Gas (High Pressure Direct Injection)

The objective of this trial was to assess the fuel efficiency and GHG enmissions outcomes of an LNG powered vehicle High Pressure Direct Injection (HPDI) technology relative to a conventional diesel vehicle. The trial involved an assessment of B-doubles operating in linehaul applications in regional Victoria.

Aerodynamic canopies

This trial sought to quantify the fuel efficiency benefits of installing aerodynamic canopies. The trial was conducted for three vehicles running metropolitan LPUD applications in Melbourne and Sydney.

Electric standby refrigeration

The objective of this trial was to assess the fuel efficiency and GHG outcomes of two refrigerated vehicles under two scenarios:

  1. When plugged in to a three-phase power source
  2. When using diesel generated power

Both vehicles operated in a metropolitan distribution application in Brisbane, Queensland.

Environmental Driver Training - Prime Mover

This trial sought to quantify the fuel efficiency benefits of implementing driver training. The trial was conducted for one vehicle running metropolitan urban haul in Melbourne.

Environmental Driver Training (rigid vehicle

This trial sought to quantify the fuel efficiency benefits of implementing environmental driver training. The trial was conducted for nine rigid vehicles running LPUD (local pick-up and delivery) applications in Sydney and Melbourne.

Hybrid technology (general freight LPUD)

The objective of this trial was to assess the economic, operational and emissions performance of a hybrid electric vehicle relative to a conventional diesel vehicle. The comparison was conducted for two local pick-up and delivery vehicles operating in the Sydney metropolitan area.

Manual tyre inflation management

This trial sought to quantify the fuel efficiency benefits of manual tyre inflation management. The trial was conducted with six vehicles running a mixture of metropolitan LPUD in Melbourne.

Automatic tyre inflation management

This trial sought to quantify the fuel efficiency benefits of an automatic central tyre inflation system. The trial was conducted with two cement tankers running regional linehaul applications in NSW.

Dual fuel Liquefied Natural Gas

The objective of this trial was to assess the fuel efficiency and GHG outcomes of dual-fuel LNG technology involving the assessment of a prime mover using LNG (throttle body injection) and operating a regional haul application in NSW.

Lightweight trailer

This trial sought to quantify the fuel efficiency benefit of a lightweight, reduced-height trailer. The trial was conducted for one prime mover and a customer-designed, lightweight (reduced-height) tipper trailer running in a regional linehaul application in NSW.

Ongoing Environmental Driver Training Case Study - Prime Mover

This trial sought to quantify the fuel efficiency benefits of ongoing environmental driver training, following a case study on the initial benefits of driver training in Phase 2 of the Green Truck Partnership. The trial was conducted for one prime mover running an urban haul application in Melbourne.

Ongoing Environmental Driver Training Case Study - Rigid

This trial sought to quantify the fuel efficiency benefits of ongoing environmental driver training, following a case study on the initial benefits of driver training in Phase 2 of the Green Truck Partnership. The trial was conducted for four rigid trucks running an LPUD (local pick-up and delivery) application in Sydney and Melbourne.

Aerodynamic device - Deflector

This trial sought to quantify the fuel efficiency benefit of a trailer fitted with aftermarket deflector device to reduce aerodynamic drag. The trial was conducted for one tipper and dog running a regional linehaul application in New South Wales.

Aerodynamic device – vortex generators

This trial sought to quantify the fuel efficiency benefit of an aftermarket device fitted to trailers to reduce aerodynamic drag. The trial was conducted for one truck and dog running a regional linehaul application in New South Wales.

Aftermarket aerodynamic trailer device

This trial sought to quantify the fuel efficiency benefit of an aftermarket device fitted to trailers to reduce aerodynamic drag. The trial was conducted for one B-double running a highway linehaul application between Sydney and the NSW North Coast.

Battery-electric distribution truck

This trial sought to quantify the difference in energy requirements and emissions of using an electric vehicle in place of a conventional diesel truck. The trial was conducted using one battery-electric truck in place of three medium sized rigid diesel trucks in three different applications in Queensland.

Electric off-engine refrigeration

The objective of this trial was to assess the economic, operational and emissions performance of a hybrid truck with an electric refrigeration system against a hybrid truck using conventional engine-powered refrigeration technology. The comparison was conducted for two local pick-up and delivery vehicles operating in the Melbourne metropolitan area.

Meta studies

Engine idle management

This study examines idle reduction strategies. The potential benefits of using idle reduction technologies in freight transport are discussed, as well as the key limitations and barriers. Some case study examples of effective idle reductions are also presented.

Survey

 

Green Truck Partnership Disclaimer

While the information provided under the Green Truck Partnership (GTP) testing program has been compiled with all due care, Roads and Maritime Services does not warrant or represent that the information is free from errors or omissions, or that it is exhaustive.

Roads and Maritime disclaims, to the extent permitted by law, all warranties, representations or endorsements, express or implied, with regard to the information, including but not limited to all implied warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, or non-infringement.

Further, Roads and Maritime does not warrant or accept any liability in relation to the quality, operability or accuracy of the information.

The information is made available on the understanding that Roads and Maritime and its employees and agents shall have no liability (including but not limited to liability by reason of negligence) to the users of the information for any loss, damage, cost or expense whether direct, indirect, consequential or special, incurred by, or arising by reason of, any person using or relying on the information whether caused by reason of any error, omission or misrepresentation in the information or otherwise.

Users of the information will be responsible for making their own assessment of the information, and Roads and Maritime accepts no liability for any decisions made or actions taken in reliance upon any of the information. Any such decision or action is made or undertaken at the risk of the user of the information.

Users wishing to rely on the information should seek their own expert advice.

The information provided under the Green Truck Partnership is released under the Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009.

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