Frequently asked questions

FAQ

  • NSW Police involvement will be limited to critical “High Risk” movements requiring complex traffic control and which require a Transport Management Plan (TMP). They will not provide escort vehicle services under the new scheme.

    In a similar way to the current process, NSW Police will receive TMPs identifying particular traffic control locations and assess if there needs to be police involvement for complex traffic control situations at particular 'pinch points' along the route. NSW Police will then allocate resources as required over and above stipulated Roads and Maritime pilot and escort vehicle requirements.

    For further details, see the Transport Management plans fact sheet (PDF, 58.11Kb).

  • All OSOM movements designated as 'High Risk' will continue to require a Transport Management Plan.

    For full details, see the Transport Management plans fact sheet (PDF, 58.11Kb).

  • The Heavy Vehicle National Law (NSW) provides the following definitions:

    • A pilot vehicle means a motor vehicle that accompanies an oversize vehicle to warn other road users of the oversize vehicle's presence
    • An escort vehicle means a pilot vehicle that is driven by a police officer or another person authorised to direct traffic under an Australian road law.
  • An Authorised Escort Vehicle Driver is an 'authorised person' and can give reasonable directions for the safe and efficient regulation of traffic (Road Rule No. 304).

    The traffic control measures are detailed in the OSOM EVDS Operating Guidelines (PDF, 1.1Mb) and are provided as guidance. Providers and Authorised Escort Vehicle Drivers must consider this guidance including the risk assessment process and guidance about the development of traffic control plans.

  • Roads and Maritime will not regulate pricing for Authorised Escort Vehicle Services. Commercial arrangements between Accredited Escort vehicle Providers and transport operators will be determined by market forces.

    Roads and Maritime’s has not set any fees for accreditation into the scheme at this stage. We will continue to evaluate this decision with any changes to be introduced in close consultation with Scheme participants.

  • The use of warning lights on vehicles is closely regulated across Australia. Clause 124(7) Schedule 2 Road Transport (Vehicle Registration) Regulation 2007 provides that:

    • Red/blue lights are used for emergency vehicles such as police and ambulance
    • Crimson lights are used for Roads and Maritime or Council enforcement vehicles
    • Green lights are used exclusively for emergency site command vehicles
    • Amber lights can be used on other vehicles.

    The Heavy Vehicle (Mass Dimension Loading) National Regulation (clause 35) further states that the warning lights on pilot and escort vehicles must be yellow.

    Requirements for warning lights have been developed after extensive consultation with industry stakeholders, the Centre for Road Safety and interstate jurisdictions.

    Two measures to improve the visibility of escort vehicles have been developed:

    1. The introduction of amber wig-wag lights to be fixed to the grill of escort vehicles.
    2. The recommendation that the warning light bar lights utilise two different shades of amber and yellow which remains consistent with the regulations.

    For further detail please refer to the OSOM EVDS Operating Guidelines (PDF, 796Kb).

    Roads and Maritime will be evaluating these requirements during the early stages of the scheme. Any changes as a result of this evaluation will be introduced in close consultation with Scheme participants.

  • Roads and Maritime is committed to the safety of escort vehicle drivers. Roads and Maritime recommends that vehicles be “mainly white” as, statistically, white is the safest colour. It is easier to see than any other colour at night, during the day and in overcast conditions. Other light colours are also seen as safe. Colours such as black, blue, grey, green, red and silver are lower on the visibility index and may be associated with a higher crash risk.

    Roads and Maritime will not enforce the colour of escort vehicles to allow flexibility for industry.

    Roads and Maritime will closely monitor colour requirements during the early stages of the OSOM EVDS. Any changes as a result of this evaluation will be introduced in close consultation with Scheme participants.

  • Roads and Maritime has consulted extensively with stakeholders, other jurisdictions and the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator (NHVR) in relation to warning sign requirements for escort vehicles.

    Clauses 48-51 of Schedule 8 of the Heavy Vehicle (Mass, Dimension and Loading) National Regulation sets out the dimensions and wording on the warning signs on pilot vehicles. The definition of escort vehicles under section 5 of the Heavy Vehicle National Law is a pilot vehicle being driven by an authorised person, therefore a different sign cannot be used under the Heavy Vehicle National Law.

    Roads and Maritime will closely monitor sign requirements during the early stages of the OSOM EVDS. Any changes as a result of this evaluation will be introduced in close consultation with Scheme participants.

  • Drivers must obey the directions of a authorised escort vehicle drivers. The authorised escort vehicle driver is an an authorised officer and can give reasonable directions for the safe and efficient regulation of traffic (Road Rule No. 304). The use of a STOP/SLOW sign by authorised escort vehicle driver is detailed in the OSOM EVDS Operating Guidelines (PDF, 1.1Mb).

  • Take extra care as an OSOM vehicle will be ahead. Obey the instructions of the authorised escort vehicle driver to ensure your safety and the safety of other road users.

  • All feedback, suggestions and comments should be provided through the Roads and Maritime online contact form.

  • All feedback, suggestions and comments should be provided through the Roads and Maritime online contact form.

Share this page: