Frequently asked questions

FAQ

  • From 1 July 2016, the phased roll out of the OSOM Escort Vehicle Drivers Scheme will be implemented as follows:

    • Phase 1: The scheme will start in the Hunter region of NSW on 1 July 2016 where there is a high demand for OSOM escort vehicle services. This phase will use trained and experienced escort vehicle drivers and will be carefully monitored and evaluated by Roads and Maritime.
    • Phase 2: Following evaluation of Phase 1, Phase 2 is planned to commence early 2017 and will cover a broader geographic region (including specific areas within Western NSW) to include movements by the agricultural industry.
    • Phase 3: Following an evaluation of Phases 1 and 2, Phase 3 will complete the roll out. Phase 3 is targeted to start from September 2017 across NSW which will establish the scheme as business as usual. Roads and Maritime will maintain ongoing evaluation and monitoring of the scheme.
    • Phase 1 will operate in the Hunter region within the following boundaries:
      Map of the Hunter region - click for a larger version (JPG, 83Kb)
      Map of the Hunter region - click for a larger version (JPG, 83Kb)
    • Phase 2 will expand the operation of the OSOM EVDS to Western NSW, the exact boundaries of which will be announced before the commencement of Phase 2
    • By September 2017 the OSOM EVDS will be operating state-wide.
  • NSW Police involvement will be limited to critical “High Risk” movements requiring complex traffic control and which require a Transport Management Plan (TMP). They will not provide escort vehicle services under the new scheme.

    In a similar way to the current process, NSW Police will receive TMPs identifying particular traffic control locations and assess if there needs to be police involvement for complex traffic control situations at particular 'pinch points' along the route. NSW Police will then allocate resources as required over and above stipulated Roads and Maritime pilot and escort vehicle requirements.

    For further details, see the Transport Management plans fact sheet (PDF, 58.11Kb).

  • All OSOM movements designated as 'High Risk' will continue to require a Transport Management Plan.

    For full details, see the Transport Management plans fact sheet (PDF, 58.11Kb).

  • The Heavy Vehicle National Law (NSW) provides the following definitions:

    • A pilot vehicle means a motor vehicle that accompanies an oversize vehicle to warn other road users of the oversize vehicle's presence
    • An escort vehicle means a pilot vehicle that is driven by a police officer or another person authorised to direct traffic under an Australian road law.
  • Eligibility for service provider accreditation involves demonstrating that the applicant has experience in managing the provision of comparable traffic management services, the ability to maintain records and ensure that the relevant insurances are in place.

    Full details are contained in the scheme Business Rules (PDF, 379Kb).

  • To be appointed as an authorised escort vehicle driver, you will need to have the competence and capacity to provide escort vehicle services in accordance with the requirements of Heavy Vehicle National Law, the OSOM EVDS Business Rules (PDF, 379Kb) and the Operating Guidelines (PDF, 1.1Mb).

    This includes being trained, competent and assessed as a suitable persons to undertake traffic control while escorting OSOM vehicles.

    The OSOM EVDS Business Rules (PDF, 379Kb) contain full details of the eligibility requirements.

    These requirements include:

    • An unrestricted Class C licence
    • Six units of competency training
    • A national criminal history check
    • A check of driving history
    • Evidence of previous experience as a pilot (minimum 100 hours across 20 trips)
    • References supporting the evidence of previous experience
    • A declaration of medical fitness
    • Participation in induction training.
  • Six competencies are required for escort vehicle drivers as follows:

    1. TLIB2004 Carry Out Vehicle Inspection
    2. TLIC3010 Pilot or Escort OSOM Loads
    3. TLIE3009 Use Pilot and Escort Communication
    4. TLIF3013 Coordinate Breakdowns and Emergencies
    5. TLIF3060 Control Traffic as a Pilot Vehicle Operator
    6. TLIH3002 Plan and Navigate Routes.
  • Previous training in any of the six required competencies will be accepted by Roads and Maritime apart from TLIF3060A – Control Traffic. This training must be no older than three years to be accepted by Roads and Maritime as part of the enrolment process. The units of competence will be recognised from Registered Training Organisations (RTO) in across Australia. RTOs will assess candidates according to Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) mapping that has been developed.
  • The safe and efficient regulation of traffic requires consideration of the safety of Authorised Escort Vehicle Drivers, other vehicles involved in the OSOM movement and the public generally. The Authorised Escort Vehicle Driver must be familiar with the material designed to support public safety in the OSOM Permit and/or TMP including route surveys, consultation with infrastructure owners and identification of 'pinch points' prior to the move.

    Authorised Escort Vehicle Drivers and Accredited Providers must also be aware of their Work Health and Safety obligations. Together with OSOM Operators, they must ensure that the health and safety of other persons is not put at risk as a result of an OSOM movement or the Escort Vehicle Services.

    The traffic control measures in Section 18 of the OSOM EVDS Vehicle Requirements & Operating Guidelines (PDF, 1.1Mb) are provided as guidance. Accredited Providers and Authorised Escort Vehicle Drivers must consider this guidance including the risk assessment process and guidance about the development of traffic control plans.

    An authorised escort vehicle driver is an 'authorised person' (Road Rule No. 4) and can give reasonable directions for the safe and efficient regulation of traffic (Road Rule No. 304). An escort vehicle driver may give the following directions to traffic:

    Warning the traffic to stop:
    Authorised escort vehicle driver in high-visibility safety clothing holding a red 'stop' sign, standing facing the traffic and raising one hand to indicate to traffic to stop

    Directing the traffic to proceed:
    Authorised escort vehicle driver in high-visibility safety clothing holding an orange 'slow' sign, standing side-on to the traffic and waving one hand to indicated to traffic to proceed

    Warning the traffic to slow down:
    Authorised escort vehicle driver in high-visibility safety clothing holding an orange 'slow' sign, standing facing the traffic and waving one hand to indicated to traffic to slow down

  • Drivers must obey the directions of a authorised escort vehicle drivers. The authorised escort vehicle driver is an an authorised officer and can give reasonable directions for the safe and efficient regulation of traffic (Road Rule No. 304). The use of a STOP/SLOW sign by authorised escort vehicle driver is detailed in the OSOM EVDS Operating Guidelines (PDF, 1.1Mb).

  • Take extra care as an OSOM vehicle will be ahead. Obey the instructions of the authorised escort vehicle driver to ensure your safety and the safety of other road users.

  • All feedback, suggestions and comments should be provided through the Roads and Maritime online contact form.

  • All feedback, suggestions and comments should be provided through the Roads and Maritime online contact form.

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