Heritage and conservation register

Item

Name of Item Drain Grate, Rose Bay
Item Number 4309674
Type of Item Built
Item Sub-Type ****
Roadloc  
Address **** New South Head Road, NE cnr Lyne Park Rose Bay 2029
Local Government Area Woollahra 
Owner Roads and Maritime Services
Current Use Stormwater drainage
Former Use Stormwater drainage

 

Statement of significance

Statement of significance The drain grate forms a highly visible and distinctive component of the low level stormwater drainage infrastructure that was built at the time of widening of New South Head Road. It is of a simple and utilitarian gridiron design that is highly unusual and was not used outside of the city areas of Sydney. The construction of the drain grate has associations with the prominent architect Herbert E. Ross who offered his services as honorary consulting engineer for the construction of the sea wall and Promenade that formed part of the widening works of New South Head Road between 1924 and 1926. The drain grate has been assessed as being of Local significance.
Date Significance Updated 29 May 2009

 

Description

Designer Herbert E. Ross
Builder Woollahra Council
Construction years 1924 - 1926
Physical description Two metal grates with dimensions of 0.40m x 0.30m inset over a stormwater inlet in order to catch debris. There are three similar grates in the vicinity along with more conventional, modern types.
Physical Condition
and/or
Archaeological Potential
Good condition
Modifications and dates ****
Date condition updated ****

 

History

Historical notes New South Head Road was completed in 1839 at least as far as the signal station at Vaucluse. In May 1848 the South Head Roads Trust Act was passed, and this enabled the Government to appoint a Road Trust to control several roads and construct tollgates. The roads under the Trust's jurisdiction included New and Old South Head Roads and Point Piper Road. It was not until the passage of the Local Government Act of 1906 that the Government gave councils in the Eastern Suburbs the authority to take charge of the major roads running through their local government areas.

During the late nineteenth century the volume of traffic along New South Head Road steadily increased. Tramlines were constructed extending out from the City of Sydney and by the 1890s a tramway terminus was situated at the western end of Rose Bay. The tram service was extended as far as Dover Road in 1900, and was pushed out to Watson's Bay Wharf by 1909.

As residential development consolidated in the area around Rose Bay, improvements were contemplated for New South Head Road, perhaps spurred on by complaints received by residents concerning its deplorable condition. Council was certainly purchasing land for road widening purposes by the beginning of 1917, and a New South Head Road Improvement Committee was formed to oversee the proposed works, which included resumptions, realignment of parts of the road and widening it to 100 feet (30.48 metres).

The road widening works took place over a number of stages, and in 1923 Council submitted a request for a grant and loan to the Department of Local Government to cover the cost of widening the road in several places: at the junctions of New South Head Road and Darling Point Road and Cross Street, in the vicinity of what is now Cranbrook School to Victoria Road, and improvements and widening between Rose Bay Park and Lyne Park.

In June 1924 the prominent architect Herbert E. Ross offered his services as honorary consulting engineer for the works between Rose Bay Park and Lyne Park, including the Rose Bay sea wall and Promenade, acting in conjunction with Council's own engineer (Howard, 2001:5).

On Friday 19 February 1926 a ceremony was held during which the widened road was opened and the lights along the Promenade switched on (Howard, 2001:6). The completed road widening was officially placed under the management and control of Woollahra Council on 17 March 1926, but during 1928 and 1929 the Main Roads Board was given wider responsibilities and so New South Head Road was proclaimed a main road under the Local Government Act and placed under the control of the Board.

The tram service from the City of Sydney to Watsons Bay was closed on 10 July 1960 and replaced by buses.

 

Listings

Heritage Listing Reference Number Gazette Number Gazette Page
Heritage Act - s.170 NSW State agency heritage register       

 

Assessment of Significance

Historical Significance The drain grate provides direct evidence of the widening of New South Head Road between 1924 and 1926. The drain grate has been assessed as being of low local significance by this criterion.
Historical Association The construction of the drain grate has associations with the prominent architect Herbert E. Ross who offered his services as honorary consulting engineer for the construction of the sea wall and Promenade that formed part of the widening works of New South Head Road between 1924 and 1926. The drain grate has been assessed as being of low local significance under this criterion.
Aesthetic/Technical Significance Surviving roadside details such as this gridiron drain grate give character and interest to the modern road and provide important reminders of the early ancestry and historic importance of the modern New South Head Road. The drain grate has been assessed as being of low local significance by this criterion.
Social Significance Drain grates by their very nature are of little relevance to the wider community. It has been assessed as being of no significance under this criterion.
Research Significance The drain grate is of a simple and utilitarian design and construction. It has been assessed as being of no significance under this criterion.
Rarity Drain grates of this gridiron design are highly unusual and were not used outside of the city areas of Sydney. The drain grate has been assessed as being of low local significance by this criterion.
Representativenes The drain grate is representative of some of the novel approaches to design of roadside and promenade items employed by the architect Herbert Ross. It is representative of a design that was in very limited temporal and geographic usage. The drain grate has been assessed as being of low local significance by this criterion.
Integrity/Intactness Intact and in original location.
Assessed Significance Local

 

References

 

Type Author Year Title
Written  Ian Berger, Environmental Technology Branch, Roads and Maritime Services   2004  Heritage Assessment of Drain Grate, Rose Bay 

 

Study details

Title Year Author Inspected by Guidelines used
Rose Bay Sea Wall and Promenade Heritage Report  2001  Rod Howard Heritage Conservation    Yes 

 

Custom fields

Roads and Maritime Services Region Sydney
Bridge Number ****
CARMS File Number ****
Property Number Road Infrastructure
Conservation Management Plan ****

 

Images

View of drain looking east along New South Head Road.
View of drain looking east along New South Head Road.