Ballina Bypass

This project provides 12 kilometres of dual carriageway, extending from south of Ballina at the intersection of the Bruxner and Pacific highways to north of Ballina at the intersection of Ross Lane at Tintenbar.

Ballina Bypass

Project background

The NSW Minister for Planning approved the Ballina bypass project on 22 May 2003.

The $640 million Ballina bypass project is jointly funded by the Australian and NSW governments.

The project provides 12 kilometres of dual carriageway, extending from south of Ballina at the intersection of the Bruxner and Pacific highways to north of Ballina at the intersection of Ross Lane at Tintenbar.

The northern end of the project from Cumbalum to Ross Lane was opened in March 2011. The section from Cumbalum to Teven Road opened to traffic on Tuesday 29 November 2011. The southbound lanes from Teven to Bruxner opened on Tuesday 20 December 2011. The northbound lanes from Teven to Bruxner opened on Saturday 11 February 2012.

The connection from the Pacific Highway to the Bruxner Highway, which was the final traffic switch for the Ballina bypass, opened to traffic on 28 April 2012.

The temporary Ballina truck rest stop area has also opened.

Reports

Ballina Bypass Surface Water monitoring report

Oct 2015

Annual Report 2014/15

Post construction operational noise report

May 2014

The operational noise report for the project provides operational noise for year of opening (2012) and predicted noise levels 10 years after opening (2022).

Photo gallery

Soft soil treatment

The Ballina region is characterised by complex geotechnical conditions, including deep soft soils in the flood plain areas. Soft soils have been an important consideration throughout the design and construction phases of the Ballina bypass project.

A combination of treatments were used to for the Ballina bypass to address the soft soil issues. These included:

  • Lightweight fill
  • Deep soil mixing
  • Wick drains
  • Vaccum consolidation (Australian first)
  • Stone columns
  • Surcharging.

The project team's innovative approach to the treatment of soft soils has had a significant impact on the duration of the project by reducing it from 13 years to just four years.

This video provides more information about how soft soils were treated on the Ballina Bypass project.

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