Rider licence

To start the process of getting your rider licence for motorcycles and/or motor scooters, you must be at least 16 years and nine months old. You also need to complete a series of training courses or tests, depending on where you live.

Plan ahead - your card may be posted to you

We're changing the way we print and issue photocards. At certain locations, when you apply for a licence, your card will be posted to you at no extra cost. When you apply for or renew your licence you will be given a paper receipt. The receipt will act as proof of licence status until your new photo licence arrives.

More information about centralised photocard printing.

Getting a rider licence

NSW uses a Graduated Licensing Scheme to ensure riders have the skills required to ride safely. The Motorcycle Rider Training Scheme is compulsory in areas where it’s available (declared areas). If the training scheme is not available in your area (an undeclared area), you need to pass the Rider Knowledge Test and Motorcycle Operator Skill Test (MOST).

You can find a rider training provider near you, or call Roads and Maritime Services on 13 22 13 to find out if you live in a declared or undeclared area.

Declared area – Rider Training Scheme

If you live in an area where there’s a training centre, you must attend and satisfactorily complete rider training and testing, before you can be issued with a rider licence.

Call Roads and Maritime on 13 22 13 to find out if you live in a declared area.

There are five steps to progress from a learner rider to a full rider licence in a declared area:

  1. Successfully complete the pre-learner course
  2. Pass the rider knowledge test - get your learner rider licence
  3. Hold your learner rider licence for at least three months, and successfully complete the pre-provisional course – get your provisional P1 rider licence
  4. Hold your P1 rider licence for at least 12 months – apply for your provisional P2 rider licence
  5. Hold your P2 rider licence for at least two years – apply for your full rider licence.

Undeclared area – tests

In areas where rider training courses aren’t available, you need to pass two tests before you can be issued with a rider licence. Call Roads and Maritime on 13 22 13 to find out if you live in an undeclared area.

Note: Even if you live in an undeclared area, you can attend a rider training course in a declared area, if you choose. You can find a rider training provider in a convenient location.

There are four steps to progress from a learner rider licence to a full rider licence in an undeclared area:

  1. Pass the Rider Knowledge Test – get your learner rider licence
  2. Hold your learner rider licence for at least three months, then pass the riding test – get your provisional P1 rider licence
  3. Hold your P1 rider licence for at least 12 months – apply for your provisional P2 rider licence
  4. Hold your P2 rider licence for at least two years – apply for your full rider licence.

Knowledge Test (rider)

The Driver Knowledge Test (rider) is a computer-based road rules knowledge test. You have to answer 45 questions. A test fee is payable each time you attempt the test.

The computer selects the questions at random from a bank of more than 600 questions.

See Driver Knowledge Test for more information.

Question Banks

You can access the DKT Question Bank for riders or riders of special mobility vehicles, which includes all of the questions you can be asked during the test. There are three answer options given for each question, with the correct answer shown as the first option, and in bold text.

Approved motorcycles for novice riders

Learner, provisional P1 and P2 rider licence holders (‘novice riders’), are restricted from riding more highly-powered motorcycles under a nationally-agreed standard.

The Learner Approved Motorcycle scheme (LAM) allows novice riders to ride only lower and moderately powered motorcycles.

Approved motorcycles:

  • Must be listed in the publication Approved Motorcycles for Novice Riders. This publication is updated as new models are approved, and lists the makes and models of motorcycles that can be ridden by novice riders
  • Must have an engine capacity up to and including 660ml, and not exceed a power-to-weight ratio of 150 kw per tonne
  • Include all motorcycles up to 660ml built before 1960
  • Include all motorcycles and scooters with electric powered engines that have a power output not in excess of 25 kw
  • Include all motorcycles with an engine capacity under 260ml except:
    • Suzuki – RGV250
    • Kawasaki – KR250 (KR-1 and KR1s models)
    • Honda – NSR250
    • Yamaha – TZR250
    • Aprila – RS250f
  • Include Kawasaki GPZ500 (EX500) and Z650, provided the rider was the registered operator of the motorcycle before 1 April 2010.

Important: It’s your responsibility to make sure that you’re riding an approved motorcycle if you hold a learner, P1 or P2 rider licence.

Motorcycle power and weight is based on manufacturer data supplied for Australian Design Rules compliance. Motorcycles cannot be modified or restricted in order to be reclassified as approved motorcycles.

Modifications to novice approved motorcycles

For a motorcycle to remain approved for use by novice riders it must not be modified in any way from its manufacturer’s standard specifications.

Only motorcycles that retain all of the manufacturer’s original equipment for that model and model variant will retain novice rider status under the Learner Approved Motorcycle scheme (LAM).

Warning: Roads and Maritime Services is the only licensing authority in NSW

A number of organisations claim that they can provide motor vehicle registrations and driver licences, including so-called '100-year driver licences' and 'perpetual vehicle registrations'.

Under NSW legislation, Roads and Maritime Services is the only vehicle registration and driver licensing authority in NSW.

Customers are reminded that:

  • You cannot legally register your vehicle in NSW with organisations other than Roads and Maritime
    Registering your vehicle with any unauthorised organisation claiming to provide vehicle registrations will mean your vehicle is not legally registered or insured for compulsory third party in NSW. This is regardless of whether the vehicle has undergone a roadworthiness inspection and/or purchased compulsory third party insurance
  • You can only get a NSW driver licence from Roads and Maritime
    Anyone getting a licence card from any unauthorised organisation will be unlicensed to drive a motor vehicle in NSW
  • Your number plates may be confiscated
    If the NSW Police stop a vehicle bearing number plates supplied by an unauthorised organisation, the driver of the vehicle may be infringed for driving an unregistered and uninsured vehicle. The number plates may also be confiscated
  • You may be personally liable if you have an accident
    In the case of an accident where the driver of a vehicle bearing number plates from an unauthorised organisation is responsible, they may be held personally liable for any damage or injury caused.

For enquires please contact Roads and Maritime on 13 22 13.

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