Roundabouts

Roundabouts help manage traffic flow at NSW intersections. Here’s how they work and the rules you must follow.

Using roundabouts

Roundabouts manage the traffic flow at intersections. They move traffic in one direction around a central island. Vehicles can turn left or right, go straight ahead, or make a full turn (U-turn).

When you approach a roundabout, you must slow down or stop to give way to all vehicles already in the roundabout.

This means giving way to vehicles already in the roundabout on your right, and vehicles that have entered the roundabout from your left or from directly opposite you.

So other drivers know what you intend to do, you must indicate when turning at a roundabout. Continue to indicate as you turn. When you leave, you must indicate left, if practical. Stop indicating as soon as you have left the roundabout.

On multi-lane roundabouts, you must follow the direction of the arrows or signs on the road.

Roundabout signs

These signs warn you that you’re approaching a roundabout:

Sign advising you are approaching a roundabout ahead
Road sign showing roundabout ahead
Give way at roundabout sign
Road sign showing you must give way to vehicles on the roundabout.

Turning left

On approach you must indicate left, and turn using the left lane, unless arrows show you can use other lanes to turn left.

You must give way to all vehicles already on the roundabout.

You must continue to indicate left as you turn.

Example of turning left at a roundabout
Turning left at a roundabout.

Going straight ahead

On approach, you can use any lane to go straight ahead, unless arrows show the lane is for left or right turns only.

You must give way to all vehicles already on the roundabout.

When you leave, you must indicate left, if practical to do so.

Example of when going straight ahead at a roundabout
Going straight ahead at a roundabout.

Turning right or making a full turn (U-turn)

On approach you must indicate right, and turn using the right lane, unless arrows show you can use other lanes to turn right.

You must give way to all vehicles already on the roundabout.

You must continue to indicate right as you turn. When you leave, you must indicate left, if practical.

Example of either turning right or proceeding to make a u-turn at the roundabout
Turning right or making a full turn (U-turn) at a roundabout.

Changing lanes

Plan ahead when approaching a roundabout to avoid changing lanes when you’re in the roundabout.

If you need to change lanes, you must indicate and give way to any vehicle in the lane you’re moving into.

You can only change lanes where there’s a broken white line. You must not change lanes if the line is unbroken.

Always remember to check your blindspot when changing lanes.

Example of changing lanes at a roundabout
Changing lanes in a multi-lane roundabout.

Exiting

When exiting a roundabout you must signal left, if it is practical to do so. You must stop indicating as soon as you have exited the roundabout.

When you travel straight ahead on a small single lane roundabout, it may not be practical to indicate left when exiting.

How to exit a roundabout example
Using a multi-lane roundabout with arrows marked on the road.

Pedestrians and roundabouts

When turning left or right at a roundabout, you do not have to give way to pedestrians unless there’s a pedestrian crossing.

However, you must always take care to avoid colliding with a pedestrian.

Bicycles and roundabouts

Look out for bicycles on a roundabout. They are entitled to use a full lane.

Bicycle riders must follow the same rules as other drivers on roundabouts. However, on a multi-lane roundabout, they can use the left lane to turn right. When turning, they must give way to vehicles leaving the roundabout.

Look out for bicycles stopped in the left lane who are giving way to vehicles leaving the roundabout.

Bicycle at roundabout example
Bicycle at a roundabout turning right from left lane.
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